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Five Ways Your Early Childhood Program Can Support Immunization by the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 3, 2016

 


During the first years of a child’s life, cognitive, social-emotional, and physical development are inextricably linked.  Poor health in a very young child can have negative impacts on other areas of development[1].  The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) considers health and safety practices as the foundation of quality early care and education settings, and includes immunization as a key component of its Caring for Our Children Basics guidelines [2]. 


Immunizations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) help protect infants and young children from 14 diseases, such as whooping cough, that can be very serious or even deadly.  Institutional outbreaks of whooping cough, such as those in a daycare center or school, are common, taking place each year in many states. Measles outbreaks in childcare settings have also been documented.  

 

“By keeping children healthy and decreasing the chances of outbreaks, immunizations can help early childhood programs create a safe environment for children,” said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, Director of CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.  “This not only applies to child care settings, but also to programs in home settings, where infants and young children be can be exposed to diseases through family and friends.” 

 

Here are five ways that you can support on-time immunization of infants and young children in your early childhood program:

 

1.       Ensure that families in your program are vaccinated according to CDC’s recommended schedule and meet your state’s child care vaccination requirements.  Consult your state health department’s website to find a list of required vaccines.  Find out if your state has an immunization registry.  If it does, ask your state immunization program if early childhood administrators can use it to verify children’s vaccination status. 

 

2.       Ensure that your staff are vaccinated as well, so that they don’t pass along a disease to the children in your program.  It’s especially important for them to be up to date on their pertussis, measles, and flu shots.

 

3.       Promptly notify your state or local health department if any children in your program come down with a notifiable vaccine-preventable disease.  Visit your health department’s website for a list of notifiable diseases in your state.

 

4.       Parents may seek the advice of early childhood program staff when it comes to health and safety issues, especially if their child does not have a regular primary care provider.  Provide your program staff with basic information about the childhood immunization schedule and the benefits and risks of vaccination.  Incorporate this information into your training for new hires and organize special professional development sessions for existing staff.  CDC’s vaccine website for parents (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents) contains useful information for staff without medical training. (See the Resources section.)  CDC also has a suite of materials for health care professionals, which can be accessed at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/conversations.

 

5.       Educate families in your program about vaccine-preventable diseases and the importance of on-time immunization.  There are many ways to do this.  For example:

a.       Post a link to CDC’s vaccine website for parents (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents) on your program website.

b.      Post messages promoting immunization on your social media accounts. Visit https://go.usa.gov/xxT7R for sample Facebook posts and https://go.usa.gov/xxT7d for sample Twitter messages.

c.       Order free copies of CDC’s Parents Guide to Immunizations and distribute them to parents in your program: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/tools/parents-guide.

d.      Print, and distribute copies of CDC’s Immunizations and Developmental Milestones Tracker: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/downloads/milestones-tracker.pdf.

e.      Print and distribute copies of CDC’s fact sheet “Infant Immunization FAQs”, which is available in English and Spanish: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/parent-questions.html

f.        If there is a disease that is of particular concern in your community, print and distribute CDC’s disease fact sheets (available in English and Spanish): https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/diseases

g.       Print CDC immunization posters and display them in your facilities: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/niiw/promotional/print-materials/ads-posters.html#print-ads

h.      Publish CDC’s drop-in articles for parents through in your newsletter or blog: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/niiw/media-tools.

 

Immunizations keep children healthy so that they can spend more time learning, growing, and socializing with peers.  Early childhood programs have an important role to play in educating the parents of young children about the benefits of immunization and ensuring that children in their programs stay on schedule with their vaccines. 



 


[1]Ensuring Adequate Health Coverage for Infants and Toddlers.  Zero to Three. Policy Resource.  March 9, 2008.  https://www.zerotothree.org/resources/442-ensuring-adequate-health-coverage-for-infants-and-toddlers

[2] Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2015. Caring for Our Children Basics. Health and Safety Foundations for Early Care and Education. 

Tags:  child care settings  Child Health  Early Childhood Education  ECE  good health  Immunizations  standards 

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Keynote Sessions You Don't Want to Miss!

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 24, 2015
Introducing Keynote Sessions you don't want to miss!

Alan Fine: Opening Keynote -Leading from the Inside Out

We are all capable of achieving everyday greatness-becoming our best self.However, many times we do not achieve our greatness because we cannot break through our own personal interference (fears, uncertainty, doubts and the voice in our head). In this inspirational and engaging keynote, Alan Fine shares a powerful approach for overcoming personal interference and achieving a higher level of performance using a simple process, Alan shows audiences how to redirect focus and discover how to unlock existing knowledge, talents, and skills, and take action to accomplish their goals and become their best self.
 

 

Valora Washington: Keynote -Leadership Lessons: Supporting Staff with Your Head, Heart and Hand

Dr. Valora Washington will discuss successful strategies used to develop the early childhood workforce.Each strategy welcomes a renewed commitment to professional development and support for continuous quality improvement. Participants will identify new ways to integrate successful strategies into career development plans.
 

 

 

 

Maurice Sykes: Closing Keynote -Doing the Right Thing for Children: Who are we as Leaders?

Based on his recently published book:Doing the Right Thing for Children: Eight Qualities of Leadership, Maurice will inspire you to rethink your leadership trajectory by challenging you to discover and actualize the leader that is within you in order to give voice to your vision and vitality to your vigorous leadership agenda for young children.
 
 
 
Join fellow leaders from across the country as they come together to learn, strategize, reflect, and share advancements in the field of early childhood education.

Don't miss out--Register for Conference today!

Tags:  31st Annual National Conference: How Successful Di  accreditation  early childhood education  Early Learning Leader  educational training  leaders  National Accreditation Commission  standards  training 

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Let's talk about...Standard A10

Posted By Erin Schmidt, Monday, July 14, 2014
Training is a vital component in the ongoing pursuit of quality. Thoughtfully chosen training takes into consideration the needs of individual staff members, the needs of the children in their care and the needs of the classroom and program environment. It is of the utmost importance that the training taken be of the highest quality and provides each staff member with meaningful professional development that is individualized to their specific professional development goals. The Formal Education and On-going Training Log is required at more than one stage of the National Accreditation Commission process and is essential in determining a program’s ongoing compliance with Staff Qualifications and Training Standards. The Education and On-going Training Log also provides a history of staff retention, training topics covered over a period of time, quality and sources of training. Using the the the following information provided, create one typed log for each paid staff member who has either supervisory responsibilities or who is included in the staff-child ratios.

Include:
- Name
- Title (Program Title: Pre-K 1 Teacher; Education Coordinator)
- Hire date
- National Accreditation Commission classification (Director/Onsite Supervisor/Lead Teacher/Asst Teacher) Each person is given only one classification, even if they have multiple roles (choose the classification with the greater level of responsibility).
- Classroom Group (Name of the classroom they are primarily assigned. If assigned to multiple groups, list each (Pre-K, Toddler 1, Lily pads, Infants).
- Typical age range of children in the group, given in months (15 mos–24 mos, 36 mos–48 mos, etc.). List multiple age ranges if staff member supervises more than one group of children.
- Number of years in ECE field
- Level of education
- Past two years of training (calculated by the date of submission to the National Accreditation Commission for review)

The formal education field should report one of the following items:
- High School or GED if no formal education has been pursued.
- Field of study and number of college credits if degree is not yet complete.
- Degree (with major, if unspecified).

For staff with majors other than Child Development (CD) or Early Childhood Education (ECE), including degrees in elementary education and staff with some college education, report the number of CD/ECE college credits in the CD/ECE Credits earned field.Training hours should:
- Include date, title, description of content, agency, trainer, and number of clock hours.
- Be conducted by a variety of sources of expertise. Some of the training hours can include in-house training.
- List individual content covered during an all-day training or conference.
- Be individualized (not be the same for all staff members).
- Include topics chosen as a result of observations or performance evaluations.
- Include management hours for all directors and supervisory staff.
- Include topics directly related to the age group each staff member supervises.
- Cover a variety of topics, with a strong focus on child development, curriculum, and classroom management, especially for staff with limited or no formal education in ECE/CD.
- Not include trainings mentioned in other standards CPR & First Aid (C7), Standard Precautions (C8), Child Abuse (C9) , Fire Extinguisher (C19) training. If these trainings are listed for convenience, the total clock hours should be zero.
- Should include the appropriate amount of hours per each staff member:
          - Director—30 hours annually
          - Onsite Supervisor—25 hours annually
          - Staff—20 hours annually

Two years of training are included with each training log submission. The two-year period is calculated by the date of submission to the National Accreditation Commission for review. To consider the training standard met, staff must meet the required training for at least one year. Once a program is accredited, staff must maintain the annual training hours to have full compliance with the standard.

Tags:  Association for Early Learning Leaders  educational training  National Accreditation Commission  staff members  standards 

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