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Interested in learning more about our Association? Look no further! Check out our blog for insightful information regarding our accreditation process, membership, conference updates, leadership tips and so much more! Our blog is intended to assist early care owners, directors and administrators in connecting to valuable resources and information. We invite you to actively engage with us by commenting on our blog! Your opinion is very much appreciated!

 

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Move from Fear to Love by Tym Smith

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Move from Fear to Love


Stuff Happens 

 

Negativity and aggression are commonly seen in early education programs, and in everyday life. Early educators must realize how important they are in influencing behavior. Teaching children active calming and to understand their own range of emotions is one small step in building a healthy self-esteem. Below are empowering tips to help understand and end aggression and negativity in both adults and children.

  

It's All About the Attitude

Every child and adult has experiences as they go through life. Experiences are then stored in the lower/back part of the brain where they sit, just waiting to be released as a behavior. When adrenal glands kick in, your brain down shifts and data stored comes out. How do you control these negative experiences? It’s simple, it’s all about attitude. Maintaining a positive attitude when situations hit you keeps your brain in the executive state, preventing you from saying or doing things that are aggressive and negative. Keep this simple formula handy through out the day…

 

Incident + Attitude = Outcome

 

Maintaining a positive attitude also makes you healthier, more successful, and more likable,

 

Three Rules for Dealing with Aggression or Negativity                                                                                                                        

Rule #1 It’s not about you! “You’re making me angry”, “Look what you’re making me do”, “You make me so sad when you misbehave” These are all common responses to negativity and aggression. When you say these things, you are giving away your power. You are letting the aggressor know that they have control over you. You must unhook yourself and not take attacks personal. The aggressor is trying to get your attention because they have a need not being met.


Rule #2 Spend time with the aggressor.

Relationships are the key to success when working with negativity. Relationships are the first survival skill learned by humans. Five minutes of focused, one-on-one time with someone reduces power struggles by 50%. When spending time with the aggressor, do not talk about the issues at hand. Spend quality time building a positive relationship. Focus on the desired behavior, rather than the negative behavior. Remember, the aggressor will try to bring you down. Your positive attitude must be stronger than their negativity.


Rule #3 Empower the Victim.

Anytime you have an aggressive act, always take care of the victim first, aggressor second. Most aggressors act out to get attention. They have to learn the appropriate way to get what they want. Once the victim receives first aid, empower the victim to express how they feel and that they do not like the behavior. The aggressor needs to hear from the victim, not from a person who did not feel the hurt.

 

Tips on Aggression and Negativity

No person can make you angry without your permission!

Don’t get emotionally hijacked. You are in control. When people or situations try to make you angry, you must not allow it. Your positive mood is stronger than any person or situation.


The motivation to be positive comes from being in a relationship

People are born to be pleasers. The need for relationship is essential to development. Relationships build trust, respect and love. When people are in a positive relationship with each other, the willingness to cooperate is greater than defiance.


You are either calling for love or showing love

In every relationship, communication has a giver and a receiver. Or in other words, you are either calling or asking for love, or giving or showing love. Don’t look at behavior as disrespectful. Look at behavior as a calling. You can make a difference in every negative situation.


Every aggressive act is a call for help

Aggressors needs three things: Boundaries, nurturing and quality time. When you experience a negative act, you must first empower yourself verbally. Letting the aggressor know what they can and cannot do to you. Show empathy for their actions. Recognize that they are needing something that is missing in their life. Be there for the aggressor. Don’t lecture or preach, simple be in their presence.


There are no “bad” people

There are no “good” people. There are simply people. People who have a need that is not being met. Avoid stereotyping and labeling adults and children who are calling for love.

 

People can only meet the needs of other people when their own needs have been met

Sometimes we expect children and adults to automatically “know” what is right and wrong. When individuals do not have the skills needed, traditional consequences do not work. Work with aggressors on life skills needed to cooperate, love and care. People will commit aggressive acts so that others will feel what they feel. We all have unmet needs. Recognize that the aggressor also has unmet needs. Be there for that person rather than pushing them away.


All aggression stems from the perceived experience of excessive pain.

We all have our own version of reality. Our experiences create the reality we live in. Showing and understanding empathy will help you put yourself in other people’s shoes. Pain is not only physical, but also emotional. There is no “cookie cutter” approach to human development. Every individual develops different needs that may or may not have been met.


Aggressive acts are normally seen through actions. But to understand aggressive acts, one must understand the factor that creates the pain. Triggers that immediately create high emotions sits inside all of us. Even most aggressors do not know or understand their triggers.

Rather than treat people as if they are different and need a label, we should understand the love and nurturing needed by this person. They may be different than you, and their needs may be different. We should not judge someone who has unmet needs or needs that do not match your own.

 

Be part of the solution. Not part of the problem.

 

 

Tags:  child care settings  director  Early Childhood Education  Early Learning Leaders  educational training  Emotional Intelligence  leadership 

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Four Takeaways - 2015 Fall Leadership Symposium

Posted By Joe Vasquez, Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Register for our Fall Leadership Symposium     

 

Join us this October for our Fall Leadership Symposium in sunny Pompano Beach, Florida. 

 

Maximize your participation by networking with fellow early learning leaders, fostering positive, long-lasting relationships with colleagues, and gaining insight from leading professionals.

Explore the best track (Director, Owner-to-Owner, Emerging Leader, and Accreditation) that fits your professional needs!  

Here are four top takeaways.

1. Networking and relationship building - meeting groups of people with shared interests is always a fun thing! Exchanging words with like-minded individuals will not only be an enjoyable experience, but can also help you grow personally and intellectually. The shared experiences and informal conversations in our networking events can help you better understand your colleagues and allow you to work together in other ways.  

2. Develop Skills - whether you're considering growing in your current position or are looking for a new role, attending the symposium will allow you to stay current with the latest trends and technologies regarding the early care and education field and help you sustain and drive business.  

3. Tracks specifically targeted for your leadership role - whatever your role might be, the symposium offers split-track sessions that can help you learn and apply new knowledge and skills that will improve your performance on the job.  

4. Relax and get inspired - attending the symposium will get you inspired by breaking out of your usual routine and helping you fully immerse in an expertise rich-environment.  

Ready to sign up? Click here.  

Tags:  Association for Early Learning Leaders  director training  early childhood education  Early Learning Leaders  educational training  Fall Leadership Symposium  professional development  training 

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Keynote Spotlight---Leadership Lessons: Supporting Your Staff with Your Head, Heart and Hand

Posted By Administration, Monday, March 2, 2015
Keynote Speaker - Dr. Valora WashingtonWritten by: Dr. Valor Washington

Leadership in our field today is about change and, as leaders, we are the change makers.

In the decades of my work designing leadership tools for the early childhood education field, I have engaged in intimate, in-depth discussions with hundreds of early educators as they define their dreams, hopes and fears about change.

In order to move forward, we as a profession will need to be a more strongly organized, effective field of practice. The field as a whole must act with greater urgency to better define our purpose and responsibilities. But while many of us hear and concur with these calls to action, some of us feel paralyzed. To the individual staff member, the job ahead might seem too big to take the first steps.

At the Association for Early Learning Leaders’ 31st Annual National Conference, How Successful Directors Lead, my keynote address highlights lessons learned about leadership, about mobilizing early educators to influence the direction of change, and about the educators themselves becoming architects of change. Supporting our staff and our profession will require strategies like building our sense of community, and sharing and learning from the experiences, wisdom and approaches used by early educators like you, and creating safe places where we can:

      o Question our assumptions
      o Engage in collegial dialog, nudging each other out of our comfort zones
      o Facilitate constructive, active learning that stimulates innovation
      o Identify options
      o Take action

You and me—ordinary people—can and must participate directly in creating positive social change for our children and for ourselves as ECE professionals. What we know for sure is that leading for change is a journey, a marathon—not an event or a sprint. We know that neither leadership nor change happen by chance—but by our willingness and strength.

To learn more about conference, visit our website by clicking here.

About Dr. Valora Washington

Dr. Valora Washington is the CEO of the Council for Professional Recognition. Throughout her career Dr. Washington has co-created several institutions, such as Michigan’s Children, a statewide advocacy group, the Early Childhood Funders Collaborative, and The CAYL Institute. Frequently tapped for senior-level service, she has been Co-Chair of the Massachusetts Governor’s School Readiness Commission; Board Chair for Voices for America’s Children; Secretary of NAEYC; chair of the Black Caucus of the Society for Research in Child Development; Co-Chair of the National Head Start Association Commission on 2010; and a member of numerous task forces and boards including of the Boston Children’s Museum and Wheelock College.

Tags:  31st Annual National Conference: How Successful Di  Association for Early Learning Leaders  CDA  Conference  Council for Professional Recognition  Dr. Valora Washington  Early Learning Leadersearly childhood education  educational training  Keynote  professional development 

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Keynote Sessions You Don't Want to Miss!

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 24, 2015
Introducing Keynote Sessions you don't want to miss!

Alan Fine: Opening Keynote -Leading from the Inside Out

We are all capable of achieving everyday greatness-becoming our best self.However, many times we do not achieve our greatness because we cannot break through our own personal interference (fears, uncertainty, doubts and the voice in our head). In this inspirational and engaging keynote, Alan Fine shares a powerful approach for overcoming personal interference and achieving a higher level of performance using a simple process, Alan shows audiences how to redirect focus and discover how to unlock existing knowledge, talents, and skills, and take action to accomplish their goals and become their best self.
 

 

Valora Washington: Keynote -Leadership Lessons: Supporting Staff with Your Head, Heart and Hand

Dr. Valora Washington will discuss successful strategies used to develop the early childhood workforce.Each strategy welcomes a renewed commitment to professional development and support for continuous quality improvement. Participants will identify new ways to integrate successful strategies into career development plans.
 

 

 

 

Maurice Sykes: Closing Keynote -Doing the Right Thing for Children: Who are we as Leaders?

Based on his recently published book:Doing the Right Thing for Children: Eight Qualities of Leadership, Maurice will inspire you to rethink your leadership trajectory by challenging you to discover and actualize the leader that is within you in order to give voice to your vision and vitality to your vigorous leadership agenda for young children.
 
 
 
Join fellow leaders from across the country as they come together to learn, strategize, reflect, and share advancements in the field of early childhood education.

Don't miss out--Register for Conference today!

Tags:  31st Annual National Conference: How Successful Di  accreditation  early childhood education  Early Learning Leader  educational training  leaders  National Accreditation Commission  standards  training 

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Take a Vacation with Education

Posted By Administration, Friday, October 3, 2014

 

 

We all have that list. It’s the one with the big picture ideas. The things to research. The big changes you want to undertake. How often do you get to actually check any of those boxes? There’s always a phone call to take, a problem to solve, a fire to put out (hopefully a figurative one).

When you’re the one at the head of an early learning center, you’re the one everyone comes to with the tough problems. It’s incredibly rewarding, but it’s also exhausting! As much as we all know we need to take a break to refresh and unwind, it’s so hard to justify stepping away. When we show up at the same place every day, we fall into routines and it’s so easy to lose sight of the big picture. We get distracted by the vision that brought us to our careers and fall into the trap of taking care of whatever is shouting for our attention right now. We all do it, but we know that’s no way to build an organization.

That’s why the Association for Early Learning Leaders is offering to take you to Pompano Beach for a few days. We know you’re too busy for a vacation, but this isn’t (just) about the beach. It’s about setting aside time to focus on the big picture. Getting away from it all means getting away from distractions, getting a fresh perspective, and maybe getting a tan while you’re at it.

The Association is run by people who get it. We know what it’s like to face the demands of being a leader in early childhood education. We tailor our programs and invite speakers based on what’s keeping our members up at night. This is your chance to get facetime with the experts and to connect with other leaders in your field. Sign up today and start packing.

 

The Fall Leadership Symposium is a gathering of experts who are passionate about early education. If you’re looking for a community help you overcome professional challenges and bring your work to the next level, this is it.

Tags:  educational training  Fall Leadership Symposium  professional development  vacation 

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Let's talk about...Standard A10

Posted By Erin Schmidt, Monday, July 14, 2014
Training is a vital component in the ongoing pursuit of quality. Thoughtfully chosen training takes into consideration the needs of individual staff members, the needs of the children in their care and the needs of the classroom and program environment. It is of the utmost importance that the training taken be of the highest quality and provides each staff member with meaningful professional development that is individualized to their specific professional development goals. The Formal Education and On-going Training Log is required at more than one stage of the National Accreditation Commission process and is essential in determining a program’s ongoing compliance with Staff Qualifications and Training Standards. The Education and On-going Training Log also provides a history of staff retention, training topics covered over a period of time, quality and sources of training. Using the the the following information provided, create one typed log for each paid staff member who has either supervisory responsibilities or who is included in the staff-child ratios.

Include:
- Name
- Title (Program Title: Pre-K 1 Teacher; Education Coordinator)
- Hire date
- National Accreditation Commission classification (Director/Onsite Supervisor/Lead Teacher/Asst Teacher) Each person is given only one classification, even if they have multiple roles (choose the classification with the greater level of responsibility).
- Classroom Group (Name of the classroom they are primarily assigned. If assigned to multiple groups, list each (Pre-K, Toddler 1, Lily pads, Infants).
- Typical age range of children in the group, given in months (15 mos–24 mos, 36 mos–48 mos, etc.). List multiple age ranges if staff member supervises more than one group of children.
- Number of years in ECE field
- Level of education
- Past two years of training (calculated by the date of submission to the National Accreditation Commission for review)

The formal education field should report one of the following items:
- High School or GED if no formal education has been pursued.
- Field of study and number of college credits if degree is not yet complete.
- Degree (with major, if unspecified).

For staff with majors other than Child Development (CD) or Early Childhood Education (ECE), including degrees in elementary education and staff with some college education, report the number of CD/ECE college credits in the CD/ECE Credits earned field.Training hours should:
- Include date, title, description of content, agency, trainer, and number of clock hours.
- Be conducted by a variety of sources of expertise. Some of the training hours can include in-house training.
- List individual content covered during an all-day training or conference.
- Be individualized (not be the same for all staff members).
- Include topics chosen as a result of observations or performance evaluations.
- Include management hours for all directors and supervisory staff.
- Include topics directly related to the age group each staff member supervises.
- Cover a variety of topics, with a strong focus on child development, curriculum, and classroom management, especially for staff with limited or no formal education in ECE/CD.
- Not include trainings mentioned in other standards CPR & First Aid (C7), Standard Precautions (C8), Child Abuse (C9) , Fire Extinguisher (C19) training. If these trainings are listed for convenience, the total clock hours should be zero.
- Should include the appropriate amount of hours per each staff member:
          - Director—30 hours annually
          - Onsite Supervisor—25 hours annually
          - Staff—20 hours annually

Two years of training are included with each training log submission. The two-year period is calculated by the date of submission to the National Accreditation Commission for review. To consider the training standard met, staff must meet the required training for at least one year. Once a program is accredited, staff must maintain the annual training hours to have full compliance with the standard.

Tags:  Association for Early Learning Leaders  educational training  National Accreditation Commission  staff members  standards 

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