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Move from Fear to Love by Tym Smith

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Move from Fear to Love


Stuff Happens 

 

Negativity and aggression are commonly seen in early education programs, and in everyday life. Early educators must realize how important they are in influencing behavior. Teaching children active calming and to understand their own range of emotions is one small step in building a healthy self-esteem. Below are empowering tips to help understand and end aggression and negativity in both adults and children.

  

It's All About the Attitude

Every child and adult has experiences as they go through life. Experiences are then stored in the lower/back part of the brain where they sit, just waiting to be released as a behavior. When adrenal glands kick in, your brain down shifts and data stored comes out. How do you control these negative experiences? It’s simple, it’s all about attitude. Maintaining a positive attitude when situations hit you keeps your brain in the executive state, preventing you from saying or doing things that are aggressive and negative. Keep this simple formula handy through out the day…

 

Incident + Attitude = Outcome

 

Maintaining a positive attitude also makes you healthier, more successful, and more likable,

 

Three Rules for Dealing with Aggression or Negativity                                                                                                                        

Rule #1 It’s not about you! “You’re making me angry”, “Look what you’re making me do”, “You make me so sad when you misbehave” These are all common responses to negativity and aggression. When you say these things, you are giving away your power. You are letting the aggressor know that they have control over you. You must unhook yourself and not take attacks personal. The aggressor is trying to get your attention because they have a need not being met.


Rule #2 Spend time with the aggressor.

Relationships are the key to success when working with negativity. Relationships are the first survival skill learned by humans. Five minutes of focused, one-on-one time with someone reduces power struggles by 50%. When spending time with the aggressor, do not talk about the issues at hand. Spend quality time building a positive relationship. Focus on the desired behavior, rather than the negative behavior. Remember, the aggressor will try to bring you down. Your positive attitude must be stronger than their negativity.


Rule #3 Empower the Victim.

Anytime you have an aggressive act, always take care of the victim first, aggressor second. Most aggressors act out to get attention. They have to learn the appropriate way to get what they want. Once the victim receives first aid, empower the victim to express how they feel and that they do not like the behavior. The aggressor needs to hear from the victim, not from a person who did not feel the hurt.

 

Tips on Aggression and Negativity

No person can make you angry without your permission!

Don’t get emotionally hijacked. You are in control. When people or situations try to make you angry, you must not allow it. Your positive mood is stronger than any person or situation.


The motivation to be positive comes from being in a relationship

People are born to be pleasers. The need for relationship is essential to development. Relationships build trust, respect and love. When people are in a positive relationship with each other, the willingness to cooperate is greater than defiance.


You are either calling for love or showing love

In every relationship, communication has a giver and a receiver. Or in other words, you are either calling or asking for love, or giving or showing love. Don’t look at behavior as disrespectful. Look at behavior as a calling. You can make a difference in every negative situation.


Every aggressive act is a call for help

Aggressors needs three things: Boundaries, nurturing and quality time. When you experience a negative act, you must first empower yourself verbally. Letting the aggressor know what they can and cannot do to you. Show empathy for their actions. Recognize that they are needing something that is missing in their life. Be there for the aggressor. Don’t lecture or preach, simple be in their presence.


There are no “bad” people

There are no “good” people. There are simply people. People who have a need that is not being met. Avoid stereotyping and labeling adults and children who are calling for love.

 

People can only meet the needs of other people when their own needs have been met

Sometimes we expect children and adults to automatically “know” what is right and wrong. When individuals do not have the skills needed, traditional consequences do not work. Work with aggressors on life skills needed to cooperate, love and care. People will commit aggressive acts so that others will feel what they feel. We all have unmet needs. Recognize that the aggressor also has unmet needs. Be there for that person rather than pushing them away.


All aggression stems from the perceived experience of excessive pain.

We all have our own version of reality. Our experiences create the reality we live in. Showing and understanding empathy will help you put yourself in other people’s shoes. Pain is not only physical, but also emotional. There is no “cookie cutter” approach to human development. Every individual develops different needs that may or may not have been met.


Aggressive acts are normally seen through actions. But to understand aggressive acts, one must understand the factor that creates the pain. Triggers that immediately create high emotions sits inside all of us. Even most aggressors do not know or understand their triggers.

Rather than treat people as if they are different and need a label, we should understand the love and nurturing needed by this person. They may be different than you, and their needs may be different. We should not judge someone who has unmet needs or needs that do not match your own.

 

Be part of the solution. Not part of the problem.

 

 

Tags:  child care settings  director  Early Childhood Education  Early Learning Leaders  educational training  Emotional Intelligence  leadership 

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Five Ways Your Early Childhood Program Can Support Immunization by the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 3, 2016

 


During the first years of a child’s life, cognitive, social-emotional, and physical development are inextricably linked.  Poor health in a very young child can have negative impacts on other areas of development[1].  The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) considers health and safety practices as the foundation of quality early care and education settings, and includes immunization as a key component of its Caring for Our Children Basics guidelines [2]. 


Immunizations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) help protect infants and young children from 14 diseases, such as whooping cough, that can be very serious or even deadly.  Institutional outbreaks of whooping cough, such as those in a daycare center or school, are common, taking place each year in many states. Measles outbreaks in childcare settings have also been documented.  

 

“By keeping children healthy and decreasing the chances of outbreaks, immunizations can help early childhood programs create a safe environment for children,” said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, Director of CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.  “This not only applies to child care settings, but also to programs in home settings, where infants and young children be can be exposed to diseases through family and friends.” 

 

Here are five ways that you can support on-time immunization of infants and young children in your early childhood program:

 

1.       Ensure that families in your program are vaccinated according to CDC’s recommended schedule and meet your state’s child care vaccination requirements.  Consult your state health department’s website to find a list of required vaccines.  Find out if your state has an immunization registry.  If it does, ask your state immunization program if early childhood administrators can use it to verify children’s vaccination status. 

 

2.       Ensure that your staff are vaccinated as well, so that they don’t pass along a disease to the children in your program.  It’s especially important for them to be up to date on their pertussis, measles, and flu shots.

 

3.       Promptly notify your state or local health department if any children in your program come down with a notifiable vaccine-preventable disease.  Visit your health department’s website for a list of notifiable diseases in your state.

 

4.       Parents may seek the advice of early childhood program staff when it comes to health and safety issues, especially if their child does not have a regular primary care provider.  Provide your program staff with basic information about the childhood immunization schedule and the benefits and risks of vaccination.  Incorporate this information into your training for new hires and organize special professional development sessions for existing staff.  CDC’s vaccine website for parents (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents) contains useful information for staff without medical training. (See the Resources section.)  CDC also has a suite of materials for health care professionals, which can be accessed at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/conversations.

 

5.       Educate families in your program about vaccine-preventable diseases and the importance of on-time immunization.  There are many ways to do this.  For example:

a.       Post a link to CDC’s vaccine website for parents (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents) on your program website.

b.      Post messages promoting immunization on your social media accounts. Visit https://go.usa.gov/xxT7R for sample Facebook posts and https://go.usa.gov/xxT7d for sample Twitter messages.

c.       Order free copies of CDC’s Parents Guide to Immunizations and distribute them to parents in your program: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/tools/parents-guide.

d.      Print, and distribute copies of CDC’s Immunizations and Developmental Milestones Tracker: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/downloads/milestones-tracker.pdf.

e.      Print and distribute copies of CDC’s fact sheet “Infant Immunization FAQs”, which is available in English and Spanish: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/parent-questions.html

f.        If there is a disease that is of particular concern in your community, print and distribute CDC’s disease fact sheets (available in English and Spanish): https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/diseases

g.       Print CDC immunization posters and display them in your facilities: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/niiw/promotional/print-materials/ads-posters.html#print-ads

h.      Publish CDC’s drop-in articles for parents through in your newsletter or blog: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/niiw/media-tools.

 

Immunizations keep children healthy so that they can spend more time learning, growing, and socializing with peers.  Early childhood programs have an important role to play in educating the parents of young children about the benefits of immunization and ensuring that children in their programs stay on schedule with their vaccines. 



 


[1]Ensuring Adequate Health Coverage for Infants and Toddlers.  Zero to Three. Policy Resource.  March 9, 2008.  https://www.zerotothree.org/resources/442-ensuring-adequate-health-coverage-for-infants-and-toddlers

[2] Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2015. Caring for Our Children Basics. Health and Safety Foundations for Early Care and Education. 

Tags:  child care settings  Child Health  Early Childhood Education  ECE  good health  Immunizations  standards 

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Plastics & Plastic Toys

Posted By Administration, Monday, January 27, 2014

Written by Hester Paul 

 

Plastic products are found everywhere; child care settings are no exception. Certain plastics contain chemicals that can harm human health and we find that some of these chemicals migrate from the product into our bodies.   (One compound is typically found in 93 percent of the U.S. population and in higher levels in children compared to adults.)


Children are particularly vulnerable to these chemicals for several additional reasons. Their systems and organs are still developing.  Young children’s typical behavior includes inserting plastic objects into their mouths.

Two compounds of special concern— phthalates and Bisphenol A (BPA)—have been found in baby bottles, sippy cups, teething rings and toys.
 
Phthalates (thay-lates) are a class of chemicals that are used to soften plastics, such as PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride), bind fragrances in products and act as solvents and fixatives, such as nail polishes. Children often inhale fragrances, chew on plastic toys and absorb products (lotions, shampoos) through their skin. Exposure to phthalates is linked to harmful health effects, including developmental and reproductive problems, asthma, preterm birth, low sperm count, genital malfunction, hormone disruption, premature puberty and development of some cancers.
 
Bisphenol A (BPA) is a hormone disrupter that is used to harden some plastics. BPA can be found in baby bottles, water bottles, canned food liners and sippy cups. We are exposed to BPA primarily through ingestion, as it travels to the body through food and drink containers. Adverse health effects may include breast cancer, miscarriages, birth defects, low sperm count, hyperactivity and aggressiveness.

As the National Director of the Eco-Healthy Child Care® (EHCC) program and a parent of two young children, I take the time to ensure that my children are not exposed to unsafe plastics.

Follow these EHCC suggestions to protect the children you care for:

1.    Avoid plastics with recycling codes #3, #6, #7 (unless the #7 product is also labeled "BPA free”).
2.    Purchase baby bottles and sippy cups labeled "BPA free” or glass options (newer baby bottles are supposed to be BPA free under Federal law).
3.    Never heat or microwave food or drink in any plastic containers, as leaching of toxic chemicals from plastic to food or liquid may occur. Use a paper towel instead of plastic wrap to cover food in the microwave.
4.    Only buy "new” plastic toys for infants and toddlers that are labeled "phthalate-free” or "PVC-free.”
5.    Discard all plastic food containers with scratches, especially baby bottles, sippy cups and infant feeding plates and cups.

To learn more about reducing your exposure to unsafe plastics, click here.

EHCC helps early childhood learning environments to be as healthy, safe and green as possible by reducing children’s exposure to toxic chemicals.

Tags:  child care settings  children's safety  plastic toys  plastics 

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