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Interested in learning more about our Association? Look no further! Check out our blog for insightful information regarding our accreditation process, membership, conference updates, leadership tips and so much more! Our blog is intended to assist early care owners, directors and administrators in connecting to valuable resources and information. We invite you to actively engage with us by commenting on our blog! Your opinion is very much appreciated!

 

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Move from Fear to Love by Tym Smith

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 31, 2016

Move from Fear to Love


Stuff Happens 

 

Negativity and aggression are commonly seen in early education programs, and in everyday life. Early educators must realize how important they are in influencing behavior. Teaching children active calming and to understand their own range of emotions is one small step in building a healthy self-esteem. Below are empowering tips to help understand and end aggression and negativity in both adults and children.

  

It's All About the Attitude

Every child and adult has experiences as they go through life. Experiences are then stored in the lower/back part of the brain where they sit, just waiting to be released as a behavior. When adrenal glands kick in, your brain down shifts and data stored comes out. How do you control these negative experiences? It’s simple, it’s all about attitude. Maintaining a positive attitude when situations hit you keeps your brain in the executive state, preventing you from saying or doing things that are aggressive and negative. Keep this simple formula handy through out the day…

 

Incident + Attitude = Outcome

 

Maintaining a positive attitude also makes you healthier, more successful, and more likable,

 

Three Rules for Dealing with Aggression or Negativity                                                                                                                        

Rule #1 It’s not about you! “You’re making me angry”, “Look what you’re making me do”, “You make me so sad when you misbehave” These are all common responses to negativity and aggression. When you say these things, you are giving away your power. You are letting the aggressor know that they have control over you. You must unhook yourself and not take attacks personal. The aggressor is trying to get your attention because they have a need not being met.


Rule #2 Spend time with the aggressor.

Relationships are the key to success when working with negativity. Relationships are the first survival skill learned by humans. Five minutes of focused, one-on-one time with someone reduces power struggles by 50%. When spending time with the aggressor, do not talk about the issues at hand. Spend quality time building a positive relationship. Focus on the desired behavior, rather than the negative behavior. Remember, the aggressor will try to bring you down. Your positive attitude must be stronger than their negativity.


Rule #3 Empower the Victim.

Anytime you have an aggressive act, always take care of the victim first, aggressor second. Most aggressors act out to get attention. They have to learn the appropriate way to get what they want. Once the victim receives first aid, empower the victim to express how they feel and that they do not like the behavior. The aggressor needs to hear from the victim, not from a person who did not feel the hurt.

 

Tips on Aggression and Negativity

No person can make you angry without your permission!

Don’t get emotionally hijacked. You are in control. When people or situations try to make you angry, you must not allow it. Your positive mood is stronger than any person or situation.


The motivation to be positive comes from being in a relationship

People are born to be pleasers. The need for relationship is essential to development. Relationships build trust, respect and love. When people are in a positive relationship with each other, the willingness to cooperate is greater than defiance.


You are either calling for love or showing love

In every relationship, communication has a giver and a receiver. Or in other words, you are either calling or asking for love, or giving or showing love. Don’t look at behavior as disrespectful. Look at behavior as a calling. You can make a difference in every negative situation.


Every aggressive act is a call for help

Aggressors needs three things: Boundaries, nurturing and quality time. When you experience a negative act, you must first empower yourself verbally. Letting the aggressor know what they can and cannot do to you. Show empathy for their actions. Recognize that they are needing something that is missing in their life. Be there for the aggressor. Don’t lecture or preach, simple be in their presence.


There are no “bad” people

There are no “good” people. There are simply people. People who have a need that is not being met. Avoid stereotyping and labeling adults and children who are calling for love.

 

People can only meet the needs of other people when their own needs have been met

Sometimes we expect children and adults to automatically “know” what is right and wrong. When individuals do not have the skills needed, traditional consequences do not work. Work with aggressors on life skills needed to cooperate, love and care. People will commit aggressive acts so that others will feel what they feel. We all have unmet needs. Recognize that the aggressor also has unmet needs. Be there for that person rather than pushing them away.


All aggression stems from the perceived experience of excessive pain.

We all have our own version of reality. Our experiences create the reality we live in. Showing and understanding empathy will help you put yourself in other people’s shoes. Pain is not only physical, but also emotional. There is no “cookie cutter” approach to human development. Every individual develops different needs that may or may not have been met.


Aggressive acts are normally seen through actions. But to understand aggressive acts, one must understand the factor that creates the pain. Triggers that immediately create high emotions sits inside all of us. Even most aggressors do not know or understand their triggers.

Rather than treat people as if they are different and need a label, we should understand the love and nurturing needed by this person. They may be different than you, and their needs may be different. We should not judge someone who has unmet needs or needs that do not match your own.

 

Be part of the solution. Not part of the problem.

 

 

Tags:  child care settings  director  Early Childhood Education  Early Learning Leaders  educational training  Emotional Intelligence  leadership 

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Five Ways Your Early Childhood Program Can Support Immunization by the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 3, 2016

 


During the first years of a child’s life, cognitive, social-emotional, and physical development are inextricably linked.  Poor health in a very young child can have negative impacts on other areas of development[1].  The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) considers health and safety practices as the foundation of quality early care and education settings, and includes immunization as a key component of its Caring for Our Children Basics guidelines [2]. 


Immunizations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) help protect infants and young children from 14 diseases, such as whooping cough, that can be very serious or even deadly.  Institutional outbreaks of whooping cough, such as those in a daycare center or school, are common, taking place each year in many states. Measles outbreaks in childcare settings have also been documented.  

 

“By keeping children healthy and decreasing the chances of outbreaks, immunizations can help early childhood programs create a safe environment for children,” said Dr. Nancy Messonnier, Director of CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.  “This not only applies to child care settings, but also to programs in home settings, where infants and young children be can be exposed to diseases through family and friends.” 

 

Here are five ways that you can support on-time immunization of infants and young children in your early childhood program:

 

1.       Ensure that families in your program are vaccinated according to CDC’s recommended schedule and meet your state’s child care vaccination requirements.  Consult your state health department’s website to find a list of required vaccines.  Find out if your state has an immunization registry.  If it does, ask your state immunization program if early childhood administrators can use it to verify children’s vaccination status. 

 

2.       Ensure that your staff are vaccinated as well, so that they don’t pass along a disease to the children in your program.  It’s especially important for them to be up to date on their pertussis, measles, and flu shots.

 

3.       Promptly notify your state or local health department if any children in your program come down with a notifiable vaccine-preventable disease.  Visit your health department’s website for a list of notifiable diseases in your state.

 

4.       Parents may seek the advice of early childhood program staff when it comes to health and safety issues, especially if their child does not have a regular primary care provider.  Provide your program staff with basic information about the childhood immunization schedule and the benefits and risks of vaccination.  Incorporate this information into your training for new hires and organize special professional development sessions for existing staff.  CDC’s vaccine website for parents (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents) contains useful information for staff without medical training. (See the Resources section.)  CDC also has a suite of materials for health care professionals, which can be accessed at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/conversations.

 

5.       Educate families in your program about vaccine-preventable diseases and the importance of on-time immunization.  There are many ways to do this.  For example:

a.       Post a link to CDC’s vaccine website for parents (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents) on your program website.

b.      Post messages promoting immunization on your social media accounts. Visit https://go.usa.gov/xxT7R for sample Facebook posts and https://go.usa.gov/xxT7d for sample Twitter messages.

c.       Order free copies of CDC’s Parents Guide to Immunizations and distribute them to parents in your program: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/tools/parents-guide.

d.      Print, and distribute copies of CDC’s Immunizations and Developmental Milestones Tracker: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/downloads/milestones-tracker.pdf.

e.      Print and distribute copies of CDC’s fact sheet “Infant Immunization FAQs”, which is available in English and Spanish: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/parent-questions.html

f.        If there is a disease that is of particular concern in your community, print and distribute CDC’s disease fact sheets (available in English and Spanish): https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/parents/diseases

g.       Print CDC immunization posters and display them in your facilities: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/niiw/promotional/print-materials/ads-posters.html#print-ads

h.      Publish CDC’s drop-in articles for parents through in your newsletter or blog: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/niiw/media-tools.

 

Immunizations keep children healthy so that they can spend more time learning, growing, and socializing with peers.  Early childhood programs have an important role to play in educating the parents of young children about the benefits of immunization and ensuring that children in their programs stay on schedule with their vaccines. 



 


[1]Ensuring Adequate Health Coverage for Infants and Toddlers.  Zero to Three. Policy Resource.  March 9, 2008.  https://www.zerotothree.org/resources/442-ensuring-adequate-health-coverage-for-infants-and-toddlers

[2] Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. 2015. Caring for Our Children Basics. Health and Safety Foundations for Early Care and Education. 

Tags:  child care settings  Child Health  Early Childhood Education  ECE  good health  Immunizations  standards 

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Top 4 Reasons You Should Attend Conference this Year!

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, March 30, 2016
AELL's 2016 Annual National Conference 

 

In our busy days, it's easy to forget the power and importance of investing in a face-to-face conversation with someone who speaks your language and shares your challenges.

There are many benefits to attending this year's conference. There is the power of being connected to other professionals who are active in your field. There are the tremendous tools and resources that might be just what you need to meet those enrollment goals or take your team to the next level. So many early learning professionals cringe at the thought of taking a few days from their program to participate in a conference, but attending an event like the How Successful Directors Lead Conference can be a real game changer for your program and the families it serves.

Choosing to invest in yourself is choosing to invest in your leadership and the team you lead!

Here are four reasons to attend the How Successful Directors Lead Conference:

1. Networking and relationship building - meeting groups of people with shared interests is always fun and empowering! Exchanging ideas and experiences with like-minded individuals will not only be affirming, but can also help you grow personally and intellectually. The opportunity to engage informally at networking events and collaborate with your peers can be a life-giving and a life-long resource.

2. Educational Opportunities - whether you're considering growing in your current position or are looking for a new role, attending the conference will allow you to stay current with the latest trends, research and technologies in the early care and education field and help you sustain and drive business.

3. Sessions tailored just for YOU - With a spectrum of topics offered that address various seasons of leadership; from the new director to seasoned executive leadership. Experts in our industry generously share valuable and practical tools that will make a meaningful contribution to your leadership and the life of your program.

4. Relax and get inspired - attending the conference will get you inspired by breaking out of your usual routine and helping you fully immerse in an expertise rich-environment.

Ready to sign up? Click here.  

Tags:  Administrators  AELL  AELL's National Conference  Directors  Early Care and Education  Early Childhood Education  ECE  How Successful Directors Lead Conference  Leadership Conferenc  Owners  Program Leaders 

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Four Takeaways - 2015 Fall Leadership Symposium

Posted By Joe Vasquez, Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Register for our Fall Leadership Symposium     

 

Join us this October for our Fall Leadership Symposium in sunny Pompano Beach, Florida. 

 

Maximize your participation by networking with fellow early learning leaders, fostering positive, long-lasting relationships with colleagues, and gaining insight from leading professionals.

Explore the best track (Director, Owner-to-Owner, Emerging Leader, and Accreditation) that fits your professional needs!  

Here are four top takeaways.

1. Networking and relationship building - meeting groups of people with shared interests is always a fun thing! Exchanging words with like-minded individuals will not only be an enjoyable experience, but can also help you grow personally and intellectually. The shared experiences and informal conversations in our networking events can help you better understand your colleagues and allow you to work together in other ways.  

2. Develop Skills - whether you're considering growing in your current position or are looking for a new role, attending the symposium will allow you to stay current with the latest trends and technologies regarding the early care and education field and help you sustain and drive business.  

3. Tracks specifically targeted for your leadership role - whatever your role might be, the symposium offers split-track sessions that can help you learn and apply new knowledge and skills that will improve your performance on the job.  

4. Relax and get inspired - attending the symposium will get you inspired by breaking out of your usual routine and helping you fully immerse in an expertise rich-environment.  

Ready to sign up? Click here.  

Tags:  Association for Early Learning Leaders  director training  early childhood education  Early Learning Leaders  educational training  Fall Leadership Symposium  professional development  training 

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Gateway City Attractions – Conference Tours

Posted By Joe Vasquez, Wednesday, March 4, 2015
Updated: Tuesday, March 3, 2015

See all the attractions that the Gateway city has to offer by attending one or more of our Conference tours.

 

Forest Park - Meet Me in St. Louis Conference Tour1# Forest Park—Meet Me in St. Louis Tour
Begin your conference experience by touring Forest Park. Your motorcoach will shuttle between the St. Louis Science Center and Planetarium, the Missouri History Museum, the St. Louis ZOO and the St. Louis Art Museum.  En route to the hotel, enjoy Ted Drewes Frozen Custard, a St. Louis specialty.

 

Wednesday, April 15 | $45 per person

 

 

  

A Little Taste of St. Louis - Forest Park - Meet Me in St. Louis - Conference Tour2# A Little Taste of St. Louis Tour

Explore the original tastes of St. Louis, during a driving overview of some of the city’s most historic neighborhoods that feature delectable delights. Attendees will have the opportunity to site see The Loop, The Hill, Soulart and Lafayette Square. Views of other historic St. Louis neighborhoods—as time permits. Treats include Fitz's Roo Beer, Ted Drewes Frozen Custard, Gus' Pretzels and Gooey Butter Cake.

 

Wednesday, April 15 | $59 per person

 

Shop 'Til You Drop! - Meet Me in St. Louis Conference Tour3# Shop ‘Til You Drop!

Shop for the latest St. Louis fashions at two major shopping destinations. The first stop is The Vault, a popular upscale resale store profiled in Resale Royalty. The Vault features an impressive selection of handbags, jewelry, purses, shoes and clothing by designers such as Chanel, Prada, Louis Vuitton, Kate Spade, Tory Burch and more!

At the St Louis Galleria, you’re sure to find something to take home with your from Nordstrom’s, Dillard’s, Macy’s, Ann Taylor and countless others. Across the street, you can visit The Boulevard which features Soft Surroundings, Loft, Crate & Barrel, and some local dining options.

 

Wednesday, April 15 | $39 per person

  

  

Experience the Loop-  Conference Tour#4 Experience the Loop

Experience "The Loop," a historic district on the National Register of Historic Places. The Loop is a six-block area complete with restaurants, shopping, art and entertainment. The motor coach will follow the old route down Delmar Blvd., entering "The Loop" through the majestic Lions Gate. Dinner is available on own at many fun eateries.

Friday, April 17| $35 per person

 

 

 

  

 

 

Beautiful Blooms and Historic Homes - St. Louis Conference Tour#5 Beautiful Blooms & Historic Homes

Enjoy nature at its finest at the Missouri Botanical Garden, the oldest botanical garden in the country and a National Historic Landmark. A guided private tram will wind its way through 79 acres of flora from a variety of diverse climates. Visit the Climatron, the first geodesic dome greenhouse based on Buckminster Fuller’s futuristic design. Included is a visit to the 14-acre Japanese Garden, considered one of the finest outside Japan.

Next, explore the real character of St. Louis through three of its most historic neighborhoods—Compton Heights, Lafayette Square and Soulard. You will also see the 100-acre Anheuser-Busch Brewery Complex with over 70 red brick buildings, several of which are listed on the National Historic Registry. There will also be time to explore your favorite areas on your own.

Saturday, April 18 | $69 per person

 

   

 

 

Anheuser-Busch and Ted Drewes - St. Louis Conference Tour#6 Anheuser-Busch & Ted Drewes

Familiarize yourself with the rich history of the colorful Busch family en route to the King of Beers—the Anheuser-Busch Brewery. During this tour you will see the World Famous Cyclesdales, the Beechwood Again Cellar, and the Brew House. No visit would be complete without sampling the family of Anheuser-Busch products during the tour!

After leaving Anheuser-Busch you’re in for one last sweet treat at Ted Drewes Frozen Custard, a St. Louis tradition since 1929. Enjoy a specialty “concrete” that is so thick you can turn it upside down.

Saturday, April 18 | $45 per person

 

 

 

Complement your Conference experience by partaking in one or more of our afternoon activities.

Register early to ensure space!

Tags:  31st Annual National Conference: How Successful Di  afternoon events  Association for Early Learning Leaders  city tours  conference  early childhood education  Early Learning Leaderseducational training  professional development  site seeing 

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Keynote Sessions You Don't Want to Miss!

Posted By Administration, Tuesday, February 24, 2015
Introducing Keynote Sessions you don't want to miss!

Alan Fine: Opening Keynote -Leading from the Inside Out

We are all capable of achieving everyday greatness-becoming our best self.However, many times we do not achieve our greatness because we cannot break through our own personal interference (fears, uncertainty, doubts and the voice in our head). In this inspirational and engaging keynote, Alan Fine shares a powerful approach for overcoming personal interference and achieving a higher level of performance using a simple process, Alan shows audiences how to redirect focus and discover how to unlock existing knowledge, talents, and skills, and take action to accomplish their goals and become their best self.
 

 

Valora Washington: Keynote -Leadership Lessons: Supporting Staff with Your Head, Heart and Hand

Dr. Valora Washington will discuss successful strategies used to develop the early childhood workforce.Each strategy welcomes a renewed commitment to professional development and support for continuous quality improvement. Participants will identify new ways to integrate successful strategies into career development plans.
 

 

 

 

Maurice Sykes: Closing Keynote -Doing the Right Thing for Children: Who are we as Leaders?

Based on his recently published book:Doing the Right Thing for Children: Eight Qualities of Leadership, Maurice will inspire you to rethink your leadership trajectory by challenging you to discover and actualize the leader that is within you in order to give voice to your vision and vitality to your vigorous leadership agenda for young children.
 
 
 
Join fellow leaders from across the country as they come together to learn, strategize, reflect, and share advancements in the field of early childhood education.

Don't miss out--Register for Conference today!

Tags:  31st Annual National Conference: How Successful Di  accreditation  early childhood education  Early Learning Leader  educational training  leaders  National Accreditation Commission  standards  training 

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Furniture & Carpets

Posted By Administration, Thursday, July 3, 2014
Written by: Eco-Healthy Child Care®

Every parent watches their infant get up close and personal with their environment -- like crawling on rugs, napping on a cushion, or mouthing an armrest.  What we may not know is that when our children pursue these natural behaviors, they may also be interacting with some invisible hazards in our home furnishings.

As the National Director of the Eco-Healthy Child Care® program and a mother of two young children, I try my best to keep our home safe from environmental health hazards.

Many parents and child care providers do not know that some household furnishings can contain toxic materials that may harm children’s health.

Two chemicals of concern commonly found in household furnishings are formaldehyde and flame retardants.  

Formaldehyde is often found in indoor air, in both homes and child care facilities at levels higher than recommended for health.  Formaldehyde is used to add permanent-press quality to fabrics like draperies, as a component of glues in particleboard furniture and plywood flooring, and as a preservative in some paints and coating products. This chemical is a carcinogen and irritates the eyes, skin, and mucous membranes. Exposure to formaldehyde can also cause headaches, nausea, burning of the eyes, nose, and throat, skin rashes, coughing, and chest tightness.  

Flame retardants -- such as polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) -- are used in furniture foam, carpet padding, back coating for draperies and upholstery, plastics, computers, televisions, building materials, and electrical appliances. Research indicates that more than 80% of PBDE exposure is from household dust. This chemical has been found in human blood, breast milk, and umbilical cord blood.
 
Infants and toddlers who are highly exposed to PBDEs may suffer damage to their developing nervous systems. High levels of exposure   can also be toxic to the liver and thyroid.

I follow these recommendations from the Eco-Healthy Child Care® program to reduce my family’s exposure to formaldehyde and flame retardants. Please click here to view EHCC’s fact sheet on furniture & carpets.  
•    Avoid wall-to-wall carpets with carpet pads; choose hard flooring (wood, tile) instead.
•    Choose solid wood furniture. Avoid use of pressed wood products that are made with glues that contain urea-formaldehyde resins (UF).

•    Keep dust levels down by damp dusting and mopping.

•    Choose area rugs that are made with natural fibers (cotton, hemp, wool) that are naturally fire-resistant and contain fewer chemicals.

•    Clean area rugs with biodegradable cleaners.

•    Vacuum when children are not present using a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter vacuum cleaner.

•    Ventilate often, and especially while cleaning.

•    Avoid products made with foam. Dispose of torn foam items (cushions, pillows, stuffed animals).
•    Choose new items stuffed with polyester, down, wool, or cotton; these are unlikely to contain toxic fire retardants.

EHCC helps early childhood learning environments to be as healthy, safe and green as possible by reducing children’s exposure to toxic chemicals.

Tags:  early childhood education  Early Learning Leaders  Eco-Healthy Child Care  household products  parental tips 

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Let's talk about...Standard D3

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, May 21, 2014
Written by: Erin Schmidt and Ruth La Brayere

D3. Written assessment is made of each child’s growth and development.


All Ages

  • Assessments are based on developmental norms and expectations appropriate for the child’s age. [D]
  • Assessments incorporate information obtained from multiple sources including observation documentation, photographs, and samples of work, as well as parental input. [SS]
  • Assessments are used to identify effectiveness in meeting goals and as a guide for future planning. [SS]
Infants, Toddlers, Twos
  • Assessments include cognitive, language, motor, social, and emotional development. [D]
  • Teachers complete assessments 2 or more times per year. [D]
Preschool
  • Assessments include cognitive, language, motor, social, and emotional development. [D]
  • Teachers complete assessments 2 or more times per year. [D]
School Age
  • Assessments include general skills and abilities of school age children. (Ex. social skills, work    habits, physical abilities)   [D]
  • Teachers complete assessments a minimum of once per year. [D]

There are important reasons for early childhood professionals to observe and complete developmental assessments for children in their classroom:

Aid in Curriculum Planning   
  • Appropriate curriculum builds upon what a child already knows and is both age and individually appropriate.  Observation and assessment made across all domains of children’s learning provides information about a child’s capabilities, interests, and ways of learning.  With this information the teacher can plan appropriate activities and experiences to help children continue to make progress.

Identify Special Needs or Special Aptitudes
  • Areas of special need may become apparent when observations and assessments  indicate a pattern of interactions, conversations, and/ or behaviors that are outside the expected developmental range.  Unbiased observations can reveal new understanding about each child’s development.
Based on these observations, the need for any of the following can be assessed:
  • program adjustments to meet individual needs
  • curriculum/activities specifically targeted to a set of needs or strengths
  • parent questionnaire
  • onsite observation by an outside organization
  • professional advice
  • intervention by specialist
Developmental Checklists are an acceptable form for completion of the formal assessment of Children.  Checklists include milestones for normal development in specific age groups across  developmental areas: Cognitive, language, motor, social and emotional development. The skills and characteristics on such checklists can be endless.  Select and use those that are consistent with your philosophy.  


Assessments for young children are not a test.  Many commercially available assessment instruments are stressful to young children and do not accurately reflect many abilities. Assessments for young children are not report cards.  They are used to learn about a child at a point in time. When used several times over the year, assessments will indicate progress made over time.

Authentic assessment of young children includes the use of developmental checklists in conjunction with other observation tools.  

Below Are the Glossary Terms that are associated with this standard and are found in the Glossary in the Appendices of the Accreditation Manual.

Assessment ..................................................................................................................................................................................... D3

A summary of a child’s progress and achievements. Checklists and assessment tools that incorporate all developmental areas can be purchased or created by the program to assist with assessment. Individually administered measurements are to be limited and evaluations that require children to be removed from the classroom setting are not acceptable in meeting this standard.

Because school-age children are thoroughly assessed in their formal school setting, assessment of these children in an after school or summer setting should be based on the goals set by the program for these children. That may be good work habits, social and problem solving skills, leadership, empathy for others, and/or other values. School-age assessments can be created by the program.

Assessment of preschoolers and school-age children serves the same purpose: to identify effectiveness in meeting classroom/program goals, a guide for planning future activities and communicating with parents.

Developmental norms and expectations....................................................................................................................... D3


Standards by which a child’s development can be measured. These are usually based on predictable age-related behaviors.

Observation documentation..........................................................................................................................................D2, D3


Short, narrative notes made at the time of or shortly after an observation that accurately describe a particular event that has been observed. There is to be no analysis of intent; only a factual report of actions and words. Written notes can be made on 3"x5" cards, on sticky notes, on notepads, or in spiral notebooks. Notes should be collected in the child’s confidential file. To be most useful, each recorded observation should contain the name of the child being observed, the place, date, and time of observation as well as the observer’s name.

Multiple recorded observations that have been collected over time will give evidence of the child’s progress and/or reveal a pattern. Information obtained from written observations is to be used as part of the evidence for assessments. Unbiased recordings of observations allow parents to get a realistic picture of their child at school.

Tags:  accreditation  early childhood education  Early Learning Leaders  National Accreditation Commission 

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